Poverty Rate Falls in Peru

One of the things that you often hear about South American countries is poverty. Except for the so-called ABC countries of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile, other countries probably do not have an economy to boast of, like North American and Western European countries.

Even among the ABC countries, Brazil and Argentina aren’t doing all that well. Peru, on the other hand, seems to be a shining example of change. Read more..

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Peru Rescues Galapagos Tortoises

A couple of weeks ago, Peru’s National Forest and Wildlife Service seized 29 endangered Galapagos tortoises from a bus, before being shipped to Europe. Peru falls in the international route to Europe for wild animal trade. The tortoises came from Ecuador and most smugglers use Peru as a transit before the animals reach Europe. Some of the tortoises were taken in by a zoo for treatment, while the rest were sent back to Ecuador. Read more..

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Peru’s Floods Raise Many Questions

As you may have already read in the news, hundreds of people have lost their lives in the recent flooding and heavy rains caused by the El Nino phenomenon in Peru. This tragic development raises far too many questions even as the number of deaths continues to increase. Almost 178,000 people are homeless and a million people’s homes are at least partially damaged. Read more..

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Peru’s Taricaya Turtle Conservation Efforts Finally Pay Off

Peru is home to thousands of species that are unique, and as the country is extremely diverse, the flora and fauna of Peru reflect this diversity. Unfortunately, many of these species are endangered due to human activities, global warming, and sheer evolutionary effects. The yellow-spotted Amazon River turtles are one of those species that are considered to be endangered. They are also quite vulnerable to changes that we are experiencing as a planet. Read more..

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Fire in the Amazon Rainforest of Peru

A raging fire engulfed Peruvian Amazon rainforest charring more than 20,000 hectares of forest land and crops. The fire broke out when an indigenous community called Pitsiquia was preparing the land for cultivation in their usual slash-and-burn method of farming. Authorities claim that less rain due to climate change and last year’s El Nino weather pattern made the Amazon drier this year. Read more..

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