Jaime Bayly

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Jaime Bayly Letts (born February 19, 1965 in Lima, Peru) is a controversial writer, journalist and TV host. He is the third of 10 children and is also known by his nickname "Niño Terrible" (Terrible Kid).

Contents

Early life

A student of a local English private school, Markham College and then at Colegio San Agustín of Lima in Lima, Bayly's academic performance was not his forte, spending most of his time playing soccer. In his early youth he was forced by his mother to work at 'La Prensa' newspaper in order to get more responsibility with a part-time job. Every afternoon after school classes he went to the office until late at night. Since then, journalism became a passion for him.

In 1982 he was admitted to study at PUCP (Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú) with the determination to become a lawyer and then a politician, but the Soccer World Cup in Spain was taking place and got his attention and he was absent from classes because he wanted to watch every game. After four years of mediocre studies he left college.

Career

His first TV appearance occurred in 1983 during the municipal elections nationwide, interviewing candidates and politicians. That job was boring for him, so he began a successful career as a late show host interviewing flamboyant and celebrity personalities.

Bayly's first Late Show, '1990 en America', got the attention of TV audiences and critics; the next year he hosted a copy of David Letterman's Late Show - 'Que hay de nuevo?', which was ranked as the most popular TV Show.

His novels are also popular and 'No se lo digas a Nadie' (Don't tell Anyone) inspired a screenplay in 1998 directed by Francisco Lombardi and starring Santiago Magill and Christian Meier. He wrote five more novels, all of them with smart arguments about politics criticism, sexual freedom and friendship.

Bayly made Late Shows abroad in CBS Network Latin America and Telemundo Network during six years. After the president of Peru, Alberto Fujimori, sought asylum in Japan (after a ten year term in government) in order to avoid prosecution on charges of corruption, independent news media found themselves in a more relaxed situation and Bayly hosted a new TV program 'El Francotirador' as a political journalist, interviewing candidates for the new Presidential Elections. In that program, he bothered several 'respected' personalities with his political opinions and finally he had to quit from that. Inspired by that experience Jaime wrote a book with the same title.

In Peru, he hosts a TV show called "El Francotirador" (The Sniper) and writes a weekly column for "CORREO", a local newspaper of right-wing leanings.

In 2009, Bayly announced he intended to run for President in the Peruvian general election, 2011 to succeed Alan Garcia. As an independent, Bayly initially polled well, pulling in 8 percent of votes. But he lacked the hundreds of thousands of signatures required to run. Without a party or a real campaign office, his candidacy was mostly a publicity stunt. His poll numbers fell, and by 2010 he had dropped his bid for office.[1] Later that year, he supported leftist candidate Susana Villaran in her successful campaign to become mayor of Lima (he almost single-handedly destroyed a conservative candidate's campaign for mayor of Lima by leaking an audiotape in which the political aspirant said she didn't give a damn about the office[2]). As a consequence, broadcasting company Frecuencia Latina cancelled his space.

With 13 novels, a syndicated newspaper column, and prime real estate atop every tabloid in the country, Bayly is the fifth most powerful person in Peru, according to the magazine Peru Económico.[3]

TV Host

He has been a presenter of several Latin American TV shows. He is currently the host of the interview show "BAYLY" transmitted in Mega Tv from Monday though Friday, at 10PM EST. The program is an almost exact replica of his Peruvian program "El Francotirador" ("The Sniper"), with more anti-socialist and anti-dictatorship satirical references to Fidel Castro[4] and Hugo Chávez and the indigenous president of Bolivia Evo Morales[5]. Jaime Bayly has a liberal agenda regarding social issues and a more conservative view in politics and the economy.

In September 9, 2008 the "Bayly" show was taken off the air while Bayly was ranting about the temperature of his studio set and his contract not being honored by Mega TV. Even though it seemed that Bayly was fired and his show cancelled, Bayly appeared on September 10th interviewing the General Manager of Mega TV, Cynthia Hudson-Fernández, who admitted giving the order to dismiss him the day before. Bayly apologized for his "unfortunate" remarks, while vowing not to return if he was censored again[6]

After a one-and-a-half-year hiatus, he returned to South Florida screens with his, show 'Bayly', which premiered on Mega TV in November 2010.[7]

Personal Life

Bayly married Sandra Masías and they had two daughters, Camila and Paola. In 1997 he and Masías divorced. In 2009 he announced his relationship with Silvia Nuñez del Arco, who became pregnant in 2010 and gave birth the following year to his third daughter, Zoe. Bayly has publicly come out as bisexual, and has declared that he does not believe in monogamy. In 2010 he had a public falling-out with Argentine boyfriend Luis Corbacho. The two met in a Buenos Aires hotel in 2002, when Corbacho first interviewed Bayly.[8]

In 2011, Jaime Bayly was the subject of a long profile in the New Times (a south Florida daily) in which he is quoted as declaring: "I'm dying. I'm 45, and I've had a good life. When I was young and living in Peru, I enjoyed life as much as I could. I did a lot of drugs. I loved cocaine. It was really good for me and good for my mind. Years later, you pay the price." According to the New Times article, Bayly's lungs and liver now barely function. (He refuses to be much more specific.) He says his doctors have told him that without a liver transplant, he has less than two years to live.[9]

Books

References

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de:Jaime Bayly es:Jaime Bayly fr:Jaime Bayly he:חיימה ביילי pl:Jaime Bayly pt:Jaime Bayly zh:海梅·巴以利

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